Author Topic: Liberman Interviews  (Read 2627 times)

AG.

  • Your true colors shown
  • *****
  • Posts: 618
    • View Profile
    • Email
Liberman Interviews
« on: June 12, 2014, 02:17:20 am »
New interview here, I found it as Vanessa has favourited it on Twitter:

http://cbsn.ws/1mJd5pz

For the first time ever, Stevie Nicks approved of the track order Vanessa Carlton created for an album.

Carlton recently finished recording her fifth full-length studio release and asked her Fleetwood Mac singer pal (and recent wedding officiant) for her input.

"I sent her the album and I think she really digs it," Carlton told CBS News. "She helps with each record to figure out the order of the songs. For the first time ever, she thought that the order was correct that I gave her, so that was good."

Recorded in both Nashville, Tenn., and England, the upcoming set, called "Liberman," comes on the heels of 2011's "Rabbits on the Run." It was originally expected out this year, but Carlton had to delay its release to 2015. Though she can't say why at the moment, she promises it's a good thing.

One aspect she can talk about is the album itself and why the music has a dream-like quality: "I just really wanted it to feel like...an escape -- kind of lush, trippy and beautiful...You really feel like you're falling into a rabbit hole of sounds. So that's the kind of record I made. It's pretty short. It's 10 songs. It's meant to be listened through your headphones."

"The name of the album is 'Liberman,' which is my grandfather's real name before it was changed," Carlton continued. "I just wanted to go back to the truth. Lee has become my middle name...His name's Alan Lee...He felt like he needed to change it. He was an artist, he was a painter. He was also a designer of shirts and stuff...He had a really successful company and at the beginning of his company, he didn't feel like it would do well with a Jewish name like that....It also means my beloved, honorable person -- all of those things fall in line to what the music is."

Although the album title is a personal, the songs Carlton, 33, wrote for the set aren't necessarily about her life.

"It's more philosophical. It's more about the human condition," Carlton explained. "For instance, one of my favorite songs on the record is the first song -- 'Take It Easy.'...I listen to Bob Marley almost every day, and there's almost a reggae approach to the lyrics. You hear certain phrases and you actually calm down. You actually chill out. I love that in music. It can almost be hypnotic. There's definitely stories in it. There's a song called 'Willow' named after the weeping willow tree. There's a song called 'The River.'...Nature is a strong theme throughout the album."

The "A Thousand Miles" singer teamed up with a few different writers and producers for the album, including her new husband, Deer Tick singer-guitarist John McCauley. They worked together on three of the album's songs -- and Carlton says the process was "awesome."

"It's so wonderful when you have a really good working relationship with your partner," said Carlton, who had previously worked with her one-time boyfriend Stephan Jenkins of Third Eye Blind on music. "It's not always the case...John is so chill. He's such a natural musician. It was such a pleasure working with him...I had kind of vowed to never work with anyone I was with after years and years ago I did a record with an ex-boyfriend. I was like, 'I don't think that's a good idea to ever do that again.' But this is a different situation. He's John McCauley. If you can work with John McCauley, you should work with John McCauley."

Carlton may have a chance to test out her new music very soon. She has an appearance coming up on Saturday in Rockaway, N.Y., as part of the Barefoot Wine Beach Rescue Project, which will host beach volunteer cleanup initiatives at 15 different sites across the country.

"It's basically a way to get people to help pick up stuff on the beach -- particularly at Rockaway because of the damage from Sandy...It's a wonderful thing," said Carlton, who will play a 45-minute stripped-down acoustic set at the event.

Carlton, who grew up in Pennsylvania, said she always loved going to the beach whenever she could.

"I'm a beach kid -- and my family all the way back to my great grandmother used to go to Rockaway Beach. They're from Queens and the Long Island area...It's an event that means a lot to me. Who doesn't love the beach? And so gross when you're on a beach and there's garbage. Everyone wants a beautiful beach."
« Last Edit: June 13, 2014, 02:01:06 am by AG. »

TRINIST

  • Your true colors shown
  • *****
  • Posts: 569
  • Perfect hair, perfect heart.
    • View Profile
Re: CBS Interview 12/6/14
« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2014, 08:57:53 am »
http://abcnews.go.com/Entertainment/vanessa-carlton-excited-tour-husband/story?id=24095216

She's also had a chat with abc, saying the album should be here at the end of next summer.

AG.

  • Your true colors shown
  • *****
  • Posts: 618
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Liberman Interviews
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2014, 02:01:56 am »
Shall we just lump all new interviews in this thread?

Quote
Singer-songwriter Vanessa Carlton may be one of the few pop musicians to cite both Aaron Copland’s “Rodeo” and “It’s a Small World After All” among her list of influences.

Throw in the Beatles, Nirvana and minimalist composer Philip Glass, and one gets a sense of how eclectic Carlton’s tastes run.

Her own music runs to keyboard-driven mood pieces, such as her No. 1 song from 2002, “A Thousand Miles.” Carlton will perform at the Newton Theatre this Friday, June 13.

Carlton’s route to music was not a direct one. A native of Milford, Pennsylvania, she was initially interested in a career in dance. She completed her studies at the American School of Ballet.

“To this day, ballet and many classical pieces of music inform my aesthetic as a writer,” writes Carlton in an email interview. “I am particularly drawn to how bombastic and complex certain classical pieces are.”

“However, a composer like Philip Glass has really made an impression on me,” Carlton adds. “I love his patterns, the cyclical stuff.”

Carlton was also drawn to various types of music.

“At first it was probably those old weird Disney songs that were written in the ’40s,” she writes. “ ‘It’s a Small World’ haunted me. Then ballet took over, and I was mostly around classical.”

“Then I went through a swing music phase (followed by) a Nirvana phase,” she continues. “Plus lots of classic bands woven into my childhood. I really loved Blood Sweat & Tears and Supertramp when I was a kid.”

“Certain Beatles songs blew my mind in terms of the melodies,” Carlton writes. “And listening to the radio in the ’90s is how I learned the structure of a pop song.”

The instant success of “A Thousand Miles” (and her debut album, “Be Not Nobody”) caught Carlton off-guard.

Getting down to basics

“I love writing little instrumental riffs on the piano,” she writes. “I think that’s what makes that song unique. The lyrics are basic. The structure is basic. The composing is me drawing on Aaron Copland’s ‘Rodeo.’ ”

Throughout the course of subsequent albums and EPs, Carlton has continued to compose her works on keyboards, either on the piano or the organ. The two instruments do make a difference on the song, she says.

“I am always struck by how different I write if a different tone is coming at me,” she writes. “I would never write what I write on the (organ) on the piano. It’s crazy.”

“I always write the music first,” Carlton claims. “Sometimes (words and melody) come together at the same time. I spend way more time on lyrics in my old age. I’m done with the diary phase of lyric writing.” (Carlton will turn 34 in August.)

“I’m reaching for something more meditative and unusual and, in a way, impersonal to me specifically,” she continues. “I love the analogy of cycles within nature and how that reflects our internal cycles of emotion. It is important to grow.”

The next step in Carlton’s growth is a new album, “Liberman,” which she plans to release this year. That CD grew out of her collaboration with producer and musician Steve Osborne on her previous album.

“Making ‘Rabbits on the Run’ in 2010 changed the course of my career and the way that I look at making art,” Carlton writes. “Steve Osborne is an incredible collaborator. A song called ‘Hear the Bells’ on that album led to this album.

“I wanted to go deeper into the atmospheric sounds that Osborne creates, and I wanted to make an album for headphones — the one that you listen to when you walk,” Carlton writes. “This album feels like a dream to me. And then at the end, you wake up.”

At the Newton Theatre, Carlton hopes to keep the dream going.

“For this album, I want to match the studio versions more, so I think I’m going … to play to some samples, which is cool. I’ve never done that before. I want the dreams to match up more.”
http://www.dailyrecord.com/story/entertainment/music/2014/06/13/vanessa-carlton-playing-newton/10327047/

TRINIST

  • Your true colors shown
  • *****
  • Posts: 569
  • Perfect hair, perfect heart.
    • View Profile
« Last Edit: June 14, 2014, 01:22:33 am by TRINIST »

AG.

  • Your true colors shown
  • *****
  • Posts: 618
    • View Profile
    • Email
Re: Liberman Interviews
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2014, 01:21:34 pm »
New radio interview:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=noVnLveR064

Haven't finished listening to it yet, but here it is for you all.

EDIT:

Not really an interview but an article about the beach cleanup she did with some nice pictures:

http://www.bustle.com/articles/28458-vanessa-carlton-gets-honest-with-trippy-album-liberman-and-an-upcoming-tour



« Last Edit: June 19, 2014, 03:01:17 am by AG. »

TRINIST

  • Your true colors shown
  • *****
  • Posts: 569
  • Perfect hair, perfect heart.
    • View Profile